The Pulvertaft Hand Centre

igeek’s work is being showcased on FileMaker’s own website. You can read the full article here.

In short, we’ve developed a system for iPad and FileMaker Pro that allows patients to the clinic to complete questionnaires before their appointments without taking up clinicians’ time.

Clinicians can develop multiple questionnaires each with a unique scoring or weighting system and these are pushed wirelessly to iPads. When the patient is handed an iPad, he or she completes the questionnaire(s) on their own before returning the iPad to staff.

Pulvertaft Hand Centre patient using iPad

The iPad then syncs with the FileMaker database to which clinicians have access via a web browser, using FileMaker’s built in WebDirect code.

The beauty of the system is twofold. Firstly, clinicians’ time is saved because the patient enters their own information. Secondly due to the potential nature of the patients’ ailments, the iPad interface is ideal, allowing simple gestures such as taps to enter information.

According to the FileMaker article’s author:

“The Centre no longer requires paper forms to be processed manually onto Microsoft Excel. The data transfer is seamless from the patient filling out the iPad questionnaire, to the auto-syncing onto the centralised FileMaker server, removing inaccurate data input. Not only is the DASH questionnaire process now paperless, but consultants can view patient data in more ways than before. The FileMaker solutions allows visual reports, such as pie charts and graphs, to be run. This allows consultants to gain a wider overview of surgeries within the Centre in more ways than before.”

igeek are pleased to have been involved with the Pulvertaft clinic and are glad that real progress has been made in terms of time and data collation. The clinic’s staff are also delighted:

“We're now looking at how we can further expand the FileMaker solution into other areas of the hospital so that any department can digitally complete its paperwork.” — Chris Bainbridge, consultant at the Pulvertaft Hand Centre.



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